ROASTED GARLIC PASTA SAUCE – We tried it, we like it

ROASTED GARLIC PASTA SAUCE – We tried it, we like it

Last Summer, one of our oldest and dearest friends, Christine Trombley, gave us a compilation of tomato recipes from Better Homes and Gardens.  We tried several of the fresh recipes and they were pretty good.

We also made a canning recipe called Roasted Garlic Pasta Sauce,  put it on the shelf with our home made pickles and jams and promptly forgot about it.  Catherine had to work on Saturday so it was on me to put dinner together.  I was craving pasta, but  wasn’t up for making sauce from scratch.  I remembered the sauce we canned last Summer, grabbed two 12oz jars, poured them into a sauce pan along with some outstanding Black Angus frozen meatballs and rose to hero status as a result.

OMG!!!.  Talk about “awesome sauce“. Catherine said that it was the best prepared pasta sauce she had ever tasted. Oh K  honey!  I have to say that it exceeded my expectations and then some.  Canning is time consuming, but this was worth it.  We are already planning to use more of our tomato harvest next season to make this sauce.  Click the link below to view the recipe for yourself.  It gets five forks from the Greg’s Garden Party Test Kitchen.

ROASTED GARLIC PASTA SAUCE

All the best,

Greg Garnache

 

A SURE SIGN THAT SPRING IS NOT FAR AWAY

A SURE SIGN THAT SPRING IS NOT FAR AWAY

THE GIRLS LOBBYING FOR A LITTLE “WALK AROUND TIME”.

Catherine and I still live in New England for a reason; we love the four seasons, some more than others.  The change from Winter to Spring is probably my favorite.  One of my favorite signs that Spring is almost here is when our chickens begin to lay eggs again after a long Winter.  The days in late February finally get long enough to trigger the egg laying gene.  The first eggs never fail to put a smile on my face.

All the best,

Greg Garnache

February 17, 2018 – My Gardening Year Starts Today

February 17, 2018 – My Gardening Year Starts Today

Hi everyone.  It has been a long time since my last post.  I started this blog soon after retiring from the work-a-day world back in 2014.  Back then, I had lots of time on my hands and a desire to “get after it”.

Well, guess what.  Life intervened, I went back to work part time, my elderly mother needed much more care and attention, and fifty other excuses got in the way.  I lost my mojo.  Not saying I have it back, but here I am feeling the need to reach out and let the world know that Greg’s Garden Party is still a thing.

Part of the reason I felt the need to blog is the fact that I planted some seeds today; the first of many seeds to come.  This happened as a result of a recent conversation with my wife regarding how much celery we consume in our diet.  That led to a question: “Why are we not growing our own.”  I had to fess up that my previous attempts were less than noteworthy.  With some trepidation I consulted all of our gardening guides for some wisdom on the subject of celery.  There was nothing inspiring.

I went on line, read a bunch of  blog posts, watched a bunch of videos.  There are a whole lot of sites with information about growing celery; most of it lame at best.  Finally, I found a charming, informative and inspiring video called ” Growing Celery from Seed.  It was created by a Chinese woman by the name of Regine and her husband Kent Norman.

Regine grew up in a small farming community in Southern China, where she developed her passion for gardening.  She earned a degree in Chemistry, met Kent, an industrial/product engineer and they decided to make a life together in Florida.  Today, they manage a small business specializing in selling seeds of hard to find Asian vegetables.

Their science/engineering background is evident in the content, presentation and production of their videos.  I highly recommend checking out the video and their site www.asiangarden2table.com .

After watching the video, I ordered seeds.  Not realizing at that time that I could actually order seeds from Asian Garden 2 Table, I went to my go to Supplier Johnny’s Selected Seeds and purchased a variety called “Tango“.

Taking Regine’s advise, I soaked the seeds for twelve hours, drained them into a paper towel lined strainer, folded the paper towel, put it in a baggie and placed it in the refrigerator for twenty four hours.  The next day, I opened the paper towel and let the seeds dry out enough to handle.  Beware, celery seeds are very small.  Thankfully, I had a tool for that.  It’s called a mini wand seeder.  I have used it in the past to handle tiny herb, flower and vegetable seeds.

MINI WAND SEEDER

I got mine five years ago from Johnny’s and put it to good use planting the celery seeds.  My plant stand is in an unheated room so I placed the seed tray on a heat mat to maintain a temperature of 75 degrees Fahrenheit.  Now, I just need to keep the seeds moist and be patient.  It could take up to thirty days for the seeds to emerge.  I will keep you posted.

Needless to say, I am excited about beginning a new gardening year and I wish you all great success in your gardening endeavors.  There’s more to come.  I promise.

All the best,

Greg Garnache