FIVE REASONS TO GROW YOUR OWN VEGETABLE AND FLOWER SEEDLINGS

FIVE REASONS TO GROW YOUR OWN VEGETABLE AND FLOWER SEEDLINGS

I have been growing my own vegetable seedlings for over three decades.  One of the first things I do every morning this time of year is to water and pamper the nearly four hundred ( yes, 400)  vegetable and flower seedlings that will be transplanted to the various gardens on our property over the Memorial Day weekend.

Lately, I’ve been asking myself “Why are you still doing this?”  After some reflection, I have come up with the following reasons and have  decided to share them with you:

PEPPER SEEDLINGS RECENTLY TRANSPLANTED TO 4 PACKS

  1.  VARIETY.  There are so many choices available for nearly every vegetable you can name, especially for tomatoes, peppers, squash, lettuce, cabbage, kale, and beans.  Garden centers tend to carry only the most popular varieties.  Starting your own seeds allows you to pick the varieties that appeal most to you.  Some of my absolute favorites are “Tender Sweet” cabbage, “Rose” heirloom tomatoes, “Matt’s Wild Cherry” tomatoes, and “Little Gem” romaine lettuce.  These are all varieties not generally found at garden centers

    CELERY SEEDLINGS ALMOST READY FOR TRANSPLANT

  2. GETTING A JUMP ON THE SEASON.  Starting seeds indoors in March for mid-April transplanting outdoors has been one of my strategies for nearly twenty years.  Leaf crops like kale, broccoli, cabbage and lettuce are particularly suitable for this approach.  I also start “Glacier Extra Early” tomato seeds at the same time so that I can get them in the ground by May 1.  Sometimes, the weather cooperates and tomatoes are reading for Father’s Day.  Here in zone 6a, that’s called “miraculous”.

    SUNFLOWER SEEDLINGS

  3. COST.  For the cost of purchasing a six pack of skinny tomato seedlings that are severely pot bound, you can purchase a packet of seeds that will provide you with 30 seedlings.  A packet of tomato seeds last me three years.  The average packet of lettuce seeds contains hundreds of seeds; a huge bargain.  The same goes for flowers, herbs and just about anything else you would want to grow.

    MARIGOLD AND ZINNIA SEEDLINGS

  4. THE SENSE OF ACCOMPLISHMENT.  There is something quite satisfying about planting seeds, watching them grow, setting them out in the garden, growing them to maturity, harvesting and then enjoying their fresh goodness.  Beware, it’s very addictive.

    BASIL SEEDLINGS. HALF WILL BE GIVEN AWAY.

  5. SHARING.  Sometimes, I think of myself as the  “Johnny Appleseed” of vegetable gardening.  Over the last thirty years, I have given away hundreds of tomato, pepper and basil seedlings to family, friends, gardening buddies, work associates, and total strangers.  Sharing is one of my greatest pleasures.

 

I know that I am probably preaching to the choir, but I felt the need to put this out there.  Happy gardening.

All the best,

Greg Garnache

 

FIVE GREENS SALAD WITH RADISHES AND ASPARAGUS

FIVE GREENS SALAD WITH RADISHES AND ASPARAGUS

My favorite way of measuring the progress of the vegetable garden  this time of year is by making a salad for lunch every day and noting how many ingredients come directly from the garden.  Just a week ago, it was three.  Today, it is a total of eight.

Asparagus production is now in “full on” mode.  My small patch is pushing up 5 or 6 spears a day.  Yesterday morning, I picked a large bowl of greens that included “Red Kitten” spinach, a few leaves of Tuscan Kale, some Red Winter Kale, some “Black Seeded Simpson” lettuce and two small heads of “Little Gem” romaine.

FIVE GREENS HARVESTED FRESH FROM THE GARDEN

This morning, I added “French Breakfast” radishes and their tops to the mix.  Pure rock-n-roll!  This is why I garden.  Fresh, nutritious food, as fresh as it gets.  We have a saying here at Greg’s Garden Party;  “Nobody eats better than us.”

THE FIRST RADISHES OF THE SEASON

All the best,

Greg Garnache